Online poetry workshops with Jackson — I’m calling for expressions of interest

If you’re interested in doing online poetry workshops with me, please express your interest. This will help me choose a time and decide what to focus on. It will take only 5 or 10 minutes, and your details will not be shared or used for marketing.

The workshops will include a little reading and discussion, a lot of writing, and some critiquing. Rather than focusing on a theme, I’m more inclined to delve into the craft of writing poetry so that everyone can grow their skills and apply them to writing about whatever they want. It’s also useful — and enjoyable — to look at a broad range of published poems to get inspiration for writing our own.

If the participants are mostly fairly new to poetry, we will focus on technical skills such as diction (choice of words), line break, punctuation, assonance, rhyme, or rhythm. If people are more experienced the focus can be broader — for example, we might cover editing and critiquing techniques, expressing powerful emotions, or making poems memorable.

Personally, I hate workshops where the leader talks and talks! so I prefer to ask questions, get the participants to contribute their own knowledge, then fill in anything that was missed.

I always begin by setting some guidelines (most importantly, no “good/bad poem” judgments, no As or Ds!) and having everyone briefly introduce themselves. This helps frame a safe, equitable, creatively free space where everyone feels valued and included and no-one feels unduly pressured.

There will be a maximum of 10 participants. The cost will be $150 ($125 concession) for five one-and-a-half-hour Zoom sessions, one per week for five weeks.

If you’re interested, please let me know. Your details will not be shared or used for marketing. The workshops will not go ahead unless enough people express interest.

A typical online poetry workshop!

2 thoughts on “Online poetry workshops with Jackson — I’m calling for expressions of interest”

  1. I’ve found that zoom workshops work well when there are about 6 in the group and everyone realises they will be called upon to participate. Without having a more complete idea of how the workshop is to be structured it is not possible to be 100% sure, but it sounds very much like the kind of thing I would participate in.

    Reply
  2. Thanks for your interest. I find it works best to do a little reading and discussion, a lot of writing, and some critiquing. Rather than focusing on a theme, I’m more inclined to delve into the craft of writing poetry so that everyone can grow their skills and apply them to writing about whatever they want. It’s also useful — and enjoyable — to look at a broad range of published poems to get inspiration for writing our own.

    If the participants are mostly fairly new to poetry, we will focus on technical skills such as diction (choice of words), line break, punctuation, assonance, rhyme, or rhythm. If people are more experienced the focus can be broader — for example, we might cover editing and critiquing techniques, expressing powerful emotions, or making poems memorable.

    Personally, I hate workshops where the leader talks and talks! so I prefer to ask questions, get the participants to contribute their own knowledge, then fill in anything that was missed.

    I always begin by setting some guidelines (most importantly, no “good/bad poem” judgments, no As or Ds!) and having everyone briefly introduce themselves. This helps frame a safe, equitable, creatively free space where everyone feels valued and included and no-one feels unduly pressured.

    If this sounds like your kind of thing, please could you fill out the survey here https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdgwqCj3gZrDxi60UbCAAs7VN8aDeJ5-1oDWxGuDkXR3fGGuw/viewform?usp=sf_link

    Reply

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